Amateur Shrink

Sample Blog Post

The brief report will be on a summary and reaction to an article of your choice from the reading list, connecting it to the greater purpose of the course (3 pages, double-spaced). This will be the same article that you select to present in-class, and content of this brief paper can be used to guide discussion.

The potential of continuum versus biogenetic beliefs in reducing stigmatization against persons with schizophrenia: An experimental study, by Martin Wiesjahn, Esther Jung, Julian Kremser, Winifred Rief, Tania Lincoln.

The authors of this research study attempted to measure, quantitatively speaking, the beliefs, attitudes and perceptions held by the public regarding the stigmatization of persons with schizophrenia.  The authors contend that the stigmatization of persons with schizophrenia results in lessened “self esteem, hope, and quality of life” for those individuals (Wiesjahn, et al., 2015). 

Moreover, persons with schizophrenia tend to be labeled as dangerous and unpredictable, with the public preferring a larger degree of separation and distance from this population, as well as favoring “structural discrimination” in day-to-day living (Wiesjahn, et al., 2015).

Recent educational campaigns by various government agencies and mental health advocacy groups have portrayed schizophrenia as a biogenic disease, similar to physical ailments.  This new perception has been endorsed by the public, which, ironically, has led to increased, not decreased, stigmatization of people with schizophrenia. 

Current research posits that stigmatization of individuals with schizophrenia can be reduced via the concept of a continuum scale.  That is, researchers propose that stigmatization could be counteracted by iterating that multiple levels of psychosis is experienced by a variety of

The brief report will be on a summary and reaction to an article of your choice from the reading list, connecting it to the greater purpose of the course (3 pages, double-spaced). This will be the same article that you select to present in-class, and content of this brief paper can be used to guide discussion.

The potential of continuum versus biogenetic beliefs in reducing stigmatization against persons with schizophrenia: An experimental study, by Martin Wiesjahn, Esther Jung, Julian Kremser, Winifred Rief, Tania Lincoln.

The authors of this research study attempted to measure, quantitatively speaking, the beliefs, attitudes and perceptions held by the public regarding the stigmatization of persons with schizophrenia.  The authors contend that the stigmatization of persons with schizophrenia results in lessened “self esteem, hope, and quality of life” for those individuals (Wiesjahn, et al., 2015). 

Moreover, persons with schizophrenia tend to be labeled as dangerous and unpredictable, with the public preferring a larger degree of separation and distance from this population, as well as favoring “structural discrimination” in day-to-day living (Wiesjahn, et al., 2015).

Recent educational campaigns by various government agencies and mental health advocacy groups have portrayed schizophrenia as a biogenic disease, similar to physical ailments.  This new perception has been endorsed by the public, which, ironically, has led to increased, not decreased, stigmatization of people with schizophrenia. 

Current research posits that stigmatization of individuals with schizophrenia can be reduced via the concept of a continuum scale.  That is, researchers propose that stigmatization could be counteracted by iterating that multiple levels of psychosis is experienced by a variety of

Recent educational campaigns by various government agencies and mental health advocacy groups have portrayed schizophrenia as a biogenic disease, similar to physical ailments.  This new perception has been endorsed by the public, which, ironically, has led to increased, not decreased, stigmatization of people with schizophrenia. 

Current research posits that stigmatization of individuals with schizophrenia can be reduced via the concept of a continuum scale.  That is, researchers propose that stigmatization could be counteracted by iterating that multiple levels of psychosis is experienced by a variety of

The potential of continuum versus biogenetic beliefs in reducing stigmatization against persons with schizophrenia: An experimental study, by Martin Wiesjahn, Esther Jung, Julian Kremser, Winifred Rief, Tania Lincoln.

Skip to toolbar